Free Webinar: Governance, Trust, and Culture: Strengthening Tribal-Academic Research Partnerships

Wednesday, October 10, 2018 | 1:00-2:30 PM ET

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Overview

Partnerships between American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) tribal nations and academic research institutions have the potential to be mutually beneficial and long-lasting, and to contribute to tribal sovereignty and research sustainability. The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) Policy Research Center and the University of Nevada, Reno recently partnered to develop a research-based toolkit, Holding Space: A Guide for Partners in Tribal Research, to share informed practices for meaningful tribal-academic research partnerships. The toolkit consists of a discussion guide and a research game centered on the notions of governance, trust, and culture—three key drivers of meaningful community-academic partnerships between AI/AN tribal nations and research institutions. This framework can help inform and improve many aspects of community-based research, including IRB review of research with AI/AN tribal nations.

During this webinar, speakers from the NCAI Policy Research Center and the University of Nevada, Reno will:

  • Present an overview of the research oversight structures that exist within American Indian/Alaska Native tribal nations
  • Explore the impact of governance, trust, and culture on tribal-academic research partnerships
  • Summarize the background and function of the Holding Space toolkit, and show how this resource can be used to help simulate decision-making and model outcomes over time in tribal-academic partnerships
  • Offer tips and strategies for IRB review of research with AI/AN tribal nations, including the assessment of both individual and community harms and benefits, and how to recognize effective partnerships between the researcher and the tribal nation

What will I learn?

After attending this webinar, you will be able to:

  • Understand the background and function of the Holding Space toolkit
  • Recognize the impact of governance, trust, and culture as a framework for building tribal-academic research partnerships
  • Describe some implications for IRB review of research with tribal nations

Who should attend?

This webinar will benefit IRB professionals, IRB members, tribal research oversight entities, funding agencies, and researchers who conduct research with AI/AN individuals and communities.

Continuing Education

CIP Credit labelWebinar participants holding the Certified IRB Professional (CIP®) credential may apply 1.5 continuing education credits towards CIP recertification. Learn More »

Collaborator

NCAI logoPRIM&R is pleased to collaborate with the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) Policy Research Center to present this webinar. The NCAI Policy Research Center was established by NCAI in 2003, and its mission is to provide tribal leaders with the best available knowledge to make strategically proactive policy decisions in a framework of Native wisdom that positively impact the future of Native peoples. The NCAI, established in 1944, is the oldest, largest and most representative American Indian and Alaska Native organization serving the broad interests of tribal governments and communities.

Speakers

Yvette-RoubideauxYvette Roubideaux, MD, MPH (Rosebud Sioux/Standing Rock Sioux) is the director of the NCAI Policy Research Center. The mission of the NCAI Policy Research Center is to provide tribal leaders with the best available knowledge to make strategically proactive policy decisions in a framework of Native wisdom that positively impact the future of Native peoples. Her prior work includes research, education, health systems administration, and policy development in the areas of AI/AN health and the quality of diabetes care. She served in the Obama Administration as a senior advisor to the HHS secretary for American Indians and Alaska Natives and as the director of the Indian Health Service (IHS). She is an adjunct professor in the department of health systems at the Management, and Policy in the Colorado School of Public Health at the University of Colorado, and her previous academic appointments include clinical professor and associate dean for diversity, inclusion and leadership at the Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine at Washington State University, and assistant professor at the University of Arizona College of Medicine and Zuckerman College of Public Health. Dr. Roubideaux served as the co-director of the coordinating center for the IHS Special Diabetes Program for Indians Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Demonstration Projects, directed training programs to encourage AI/AN students to enter health and research professions, is a founder of the Native Research Network, Inc., and served as president of the Association of American Indian Physicians. Dr. Roubideaux received her undergraduate, medical, and public health degrees at Harvard, is the author of several peer-reviewed research publications, and co-edited the 2001 book Promises to Keep: Public Health Policy for American Indians and Alaska Natives.

Julie-LuceroJulie Lucero, PhD, MPH is assistant professor in the School of Community Health Sciences at the University of Nevada, Reno. Using mixed methods and community based participatory research (CBPR), Dr. Lucero's research is centered on the identification of modifiable social determinants to reduce the impact of health inequities within marginalized populations. Dr. Lucero has been involved with CBPR projects in collaboration with American Indian, Hispanic, and LGBT communities. These projects examined factors associated with substance abuse, mental health, positive youth development, and service utilization. Her current research explores the role of trust in promoting effective processes and outcomes in community-academic partnerships. In previous research, we found trust at the beginning of research partnerships to be significantly associated with participation, power relations, sustainability, and overall research outcomes. Furthermore, trust, governance and culture were found to be significant cross-cutting themes (pillars) associated with a variety of outcomes throughout the partnering and research process. Building on these findings, she is currently collaborating with the NCAI PRC (2013-2018; U261IHS0082-01-02) to develop a toolkit focused on the three pillars and identify dissemination and implementation factors for toolkit uptake in tribal-academic partnerships. Acknowledging the fragile nature of trust, future research will utilize system dynamics modeling to identify concepts and constructs associated change in trust over partnership lifespans.

Additional Resources

A collection of relevant background reading, further reading, links, templates, checklists, and/or charts accompany each PRIM&R webinar. Groups that register for webinars receive a discussion guide containing thought-provoking questions and facilitation tips that may help in using the webinar as an educational tool for IRBs.

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